OS Version Queries for WMI Filters

NOTE: Updated Feb 13, 2020 to include Windows Server 2019

More likely than not, if you’re using Group Policy to push out software installation or registry entries to client machines or servers on the domain, the particular policy settings may be different depending on the OS version or architecture.

Examples, Group Policy Objects may need to be filtered by:

  • Desktop OS / Server OS
  • Domain Controller / Non-Domain Controller
  • 32-bit / 64-bit

If you haven’t used Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) filters before, they show up in Group Policy Management at the bottom, between Group Policy Objects and Starter GPOs.

Common OS WMI Filters

The WMI filters use a query to scope down the Group Policy Object applicability. Here’s what a typical WMI OS filter looks like:

WMI filter

select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like

WMI Win32_OperatingSystem ProductType Tips:

  • ProductType 1 = Desktop OS
  • ProductType 2 = Server OS – Domain Controller
  • ProductType 3 = Server OS – Not a Domain Controller

WMI Win32_OperatingSystem Version Number Tips:

  • 5.1 – Windows XP
  • 5.2 – Windows Server 2003
  • 5.2.3 – Windows Server 2003 R2
  • 6.0 – Windows Vista & Windows Server 2008
  • 6.1 – Windows 7 & Windows Server 2008 R2
  • 6.2 – Windows 8 & Windows Server 2012
  • 6.3 – Windows 8.1 & Windows Server 2012 R2
  • 10.0 – Windows 10 & Windows Server 2016 & 2019

To create your own WMI filters, here is an updated list of WMI filter queries from Window XP – Windows 10 and from Server 2003 to Server 2019.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:
Always test your Group Policies and WMI filters before deploying.

DESKTOP WMI QUERIES

ANY WINDOWS DESKTOP OS

  • Any Windows Desktop OS – Version 1
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1”
  • Any Windows Desktop OS – Version 2 (better for Win7 sometimes)
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType <> “2”) AND (ProductType <> “3”)
  • Any Windows Desktop OS – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1” AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Desktop OS – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1” AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS XP

  • Windows XP
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “5.1%” or Version like “5.2%”) AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows XP – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “5.1%” or Version like “5.2%”) AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows XP – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “5.1%” or Version like “5.2%”) AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS VISTA

  • Windows Vista
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows Vista – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Vista – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 7

  • Windows 7
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 7 – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 7 – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 8

  • Windows 8
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.2%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 8 – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.2%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 8 – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.2%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 8.1

  • Windows 8.1
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 8.1 – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 8.1 – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 10

  • Windows 10
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “10.0%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 10 – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “10.0%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 10 – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “10.0%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

SERVER WMI QUERIES

ANY WINDOWS SERVER OS

  • Any Windows Server OS
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”)
  • Any Windows Server OS – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server OS – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “2”)
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “2”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “2”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Non-Domain Controller
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “3”)
  • Any Windows Server – Non- Domain Controller – 32-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “3”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Non-Domain Controller – 64-bit
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (ProductType = “3”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS SERVER 2003

  • Windows Server 2003     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2003 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2003 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType=”3″
  • Windows Server 2003 – 32-bit – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType=”2″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2003 – 32-bit – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType=”3″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2003 – 64-bit – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType=”2″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2003 – 64-bit – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2%” AND ProductType=”3″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS SERVER 2003 R2

  • Windows Server 2003 R2     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType=”3″
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 – 32-bit – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType=”2″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 – 32-bit – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType=”3″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 – 64-bit – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType=”2″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2003 R2 – 64-bit – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “5.2.3%” AND ProductType=”3″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS SERVER 2008

  • Windows Server 2008     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2008DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2008 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”3″
  • Windows Server 2008 – 32-bit – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”2″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2008 – 32-bit – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”3″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2008 – 64-bit – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”2″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows Server 2008 – 64-bit – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.0%” AND ProductType=”3″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2

  • Windows Server 2008 R2     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.1%” AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.1%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.1%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2012

  • Windows Server 2012     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.2%” AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2012 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.2%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2012 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.2%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2

  • Windows Server 2012R2     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.3%” AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.3%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version LIKE “6.3%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2016 *

  • Windows Server 2016     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “10.0.14393%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.16299%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.17134%”) AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2016 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “10.0.14393%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.16299%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.17134%”) AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2016 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “10.0.14393%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.16299%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.17134%”) AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2019 *

  • Windows Server 2019     
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “10.0.17763%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.18362%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.18363%”) AND ProductType<>”1″
  • Windows Server 2019 – DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “10.0.17763%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.18362%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.18363%”) AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2019 – non-DC
    SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE (Version LIKE “10.0.17763%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.18362%”) OR (Version LIKE “10.0.18363%”) AND ProductType=”3″

* A few notes about the “OR” operator:

First – The reason for the “OR” statements in Server 2016 and Server 2019 WMI Query Filters is because there are multiple builds, as shown in the table below. These multiple builds are part of Microsoft’s Windows as a service (Waas) plan.

Second – “Or” combines two conditions. When more than one logical operator is used in a statement, the OR operators are evaluated after the AND operators. (Source)

Major Minor Version Build Info Released
10 0 1607 14393 2016 RTM LTSC 09/26/2016
10 0 1709 16299 2016 SAC 10/17/2017
10 0 1803 17134 2016 SAC 04/30/2018
10 0 1809 17763 2019 LTSC 11/13/2018
10 0 1903 18362 2019 SAC 5/21/2019
10 0 1909 18363 2019 SAC 11/12/2019

Helpful OS Term Abbreviations



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    Remote Desktop Connection Tips

    OK, so I’m probably the last person on the planet to learn of this feature, but on the left side of Remote Desktop Connection (MSTSC.exe) there’s a drop-down that exposes features for Windows 8, 8.1, Server 2012 and Server 2012 R2.

    Drop-down for Windows 8 in latest RDP client

    This is helpful when you’re on a Win8.x or 2012/R2 machine, RDPed into another machine and you’re not sure if (when you mouse up to the top-right or bottom-right) if you’re popping up the charms menu for your machine or the remote machine.

    Also, speaking of Remote Desktop, there are 2 pieces to the puzzle:

    • Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) – server
    • Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) – client

    Below are the current versions and key features.

    RDP 8.0 update (10/23/2012)
    Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2592687 

    • RemoteFX for WAN
    • RemoteFX Network Auto Detect
    • RemoteFX Adaptive Graphics
    • RemoteFX Media Streaming
    • RemoteFX USB Redirection for non-RemoteFX vGPU virtual desktops
    • Support for nested sessions
    • Performance counters for monitoring user experience

    RDC 8.1 update (2/10/2014)
    Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2
    http://support.microsoft.com/KB/2830477

    • Full support of transparent windows
    • Moves and resizes of RemoteApp windows
    • Thumbnails, aero peek, and live taskbar
    • Dynamic monitor and resolution changes
    • Support for session shadowing
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    Download – Introducing Windows 8 eBook

    eBook - Introducint Windows 8: An Overview for IT ProfessionalsTitle: Introducing Windows 8 – An Overview for IT Professionals
    Free Preview
    Author: Jerry Honeycutt
    Publisher: Microsoft Press
    Published: © 2012 by Microsoft Corporation
    Pages: 147
    ISBN: 978-0-7356-7050-1
    File size: 6.44 MB
    Price: FREE preview*
    Download URL: Click here for download

    * This preview is the first 11 chapters

    Table of Contents

    • Chapter 1: Overview
    • Chapter 2: Experiencing Windows 8
    • Chapter 3: Windows 8 for IT Pros
    • Chapter 4: Preparing for Deployment
    • Chapter 5: Deploying Windows 8
    • Chapter 6: Delivering Windows Apps
    • Chapter 7: Windows 8 Recovery
    • Chapter 8: Windows 8 Management
    • Chapter 9: Windows 8 Security
    • Chapter 10: Internet Explorer 10
    • Chapter 11: Windows 8 Virtualization

    Description

    The Windows 8 operating system is the newest member of the Microsoft Windows family. It differs from earlier Windows releases as much for what it does not change as for what it does change. That is, the features that IT pros loved about Windows 7 are still there in Windows 8—just better. The same keyboard shortcuts, management tools, security features, and deployment options are available in Windows 8. But in many cases, Windows 8 improves them in intuitive and significant ways. Some examples are the ribbon in File Explorer and faster disk encryption when using BitLocker Drive Encryption. This book describes these enhancements plus many of the new features in Windows 8.

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    Video – Using the Windows 8 Start Screen

    The biggest push-back I hear about Windows 8 involves the huge amount of ‘who moved my cheese’. Folks generally don’t like it when you move their icons and navigation around.

    Fortunately, Microsoft MVP Mike Halsey has a great video that shows the basics of how to navigate the Windows 8 Start Screen. Enjoy!

    Using the Windows 8 Start Screen
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